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Chuck Jones Galleries

The Chuck Jones Galleries are owned and operated by the family of Chuck Jones.  The parent company, Linda Jones Enterprises was founded in 1977 by Chuck Jones's daughter, Linda, with the mission to find artwork wherever it is, whether it is inside of an artist or in someone's attic and bring it to collectors who love the artwork.

The Chuck Jones Galleries were established in 1991 with its first location in Corona del Mar where Chuck Jones lived.

There are now Chuck Jones Galleries in Orange County, California residing in the South Coast Collection (SOCO) in Costa Mesa, a block of the central Plaza in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and in the Gaslamp district in San Diego, California.

The Galleries now represent over 20 artists and studios and provide special works of art to thousands of collectors all over the world.

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About Chuck Jones

“ANIMATION ISN’T THE ILLUSION OF LIFE; IT IS LIFE.”

In a career spanning over 60 years, Jones made more than 300 animated films, winning three Oscars as director and in 1996 an honorary Oscar for Lifetime Achievement. Among the many awards and recognitions, one of those most valued was the honorary life membership from the Directors Guild of America.

During the Golden Age of animation Jones helped bring to life many of Warner Bros. most famous characters—Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Elmer Fudd and Porky Pig. The list of characters he created himself includes Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Marvin Martian, Pepe le Pew, Michigan J. Frog and many others. He also produced, directed and wrote the screenplays for “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” a television classic, as well as the feature-length film “The Phantom Tollbooth.”

In addition, Jones was a prolific artist whose work has been exhibited at galleries and museums worldwide. Jones often recalled a small child who, when told that Jones drew Bugs Bunny, replied: “He doesn’t draw Bugs Bunny. He draws pictures of Bugs Bunny.”

His point was that the child thought of the character as being alive and believable, which was, in Jones’ belief, the key to true character animation.