I Like Them, Sam I Am!

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I Like Them, Sam I Am!

2,495.00

Adapted posthumously from the original pre-production drawing for the 1960 book, Green Eggs and Ham


Medium: Serigraph on Archival Paper
Size: 28” x 38.75” 

Price: $2495, unframed

Released: 2014

Please contact your consultant for details and availability.

Reference: S-PSAM
 

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Adapted posthumously from the original preproduction drawing for the 1960 book, Green Eggs and Ham

Dr. Seuss’s savvy in production matters was legendary at Random House and, as their staff confirmed, he was in total control of not only his verse, but also his color selections. Artistically, Ted Geisel’s genius is often hidden away in the overlooked nuances of his preliminary works.  

Details were important to Dr. Seuss, especially when it came to his color notations, which often expanded into full-blown color charts. Here his notation “white bone” may seem inconsequential, but artistically it’s the detail that gives a visual pop to the most famous ham in literary history. 

“The animator Chuck Jones offered an insider’s critique of Green Eggs. Oddity, he argued, is the key to such creativity; the most interesting thing is the unexpected. Ted took ‘the common phrase, ham and eggs, and commanded attention by reversing it. Ted’s stuff,’ Jones said, ‘has that quality of puzzlement.’”

“Critics did not overlook the Seussian tone of defiance. Sam-I-am drives his victim crazy, pursuing him everywhere while he urges him to eat something disgusting. Literature had seldom afforded children an opportunity to ally themselves with such open antagonism. Ted was building on the breakthrough of The Cat in the Hat, whose boisterous rampage in the absence of adults went unpunished, alarming some of the school establishment who felt safer with Dick and Jane and considered the Cat ‘a trickster hero.’” (Dr. Seuss & Mr. Geisel, p. 170-171)